Website Accessibility - U7 Solutions
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Website Accessibility

Being inclusive for people with visual, hearing, motor and cognitive impairments.
 
 

People who have a disability can access the web – but only websites and mobile apps that have been designed with their capabilities in mind. Website accessibility is making sure you haven’t excluded people with visual, hearing, motor or cognitive impairments from accessing your content. According to Statistics Canada’s 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability, 22% of Canadians (6.2 million people) over the age of 15 have at least one disability that limits everyday activities.

What are the full advantages of Website Accessibility?

What are the steps to Website Accessibility?

Pricing and Plans

Accessibility FAQs

1How many people require accessible websites?
According to Statistics Canada’s 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability, 22% of Canadians (6.2 million people) over the age of 15 have at least one disability that limits everyday activities.
2Is it illegal to not have an accessible website?
Neglecting web accessibility in Canada could put you at risk of violating various Equality and Accessibility Acts such as the AODA and Bill C-81. The best way to avoid these violations is to follow the WCAG (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines). The WCAG aims to provide a standard for web content accessibility that meets the needs of individuals, organizations, and governments on an international basis. Complying with these acts and guidelines will lower the risk of legal action. All public sector organizations (including government, municipalities, and educational institutions) and all private organizations with 50 or more employees (including businesses, nonprofits, and private educational institutions) are required to be WCAG 2.0 AA accessible (excluding live captioning and audio descriptions) by January 1st, 2021.
3What are the Key Principles of Web Accessibility?
In order to implement effective web accessibility, it’s important to consider POUR, an acronym for four key principles that describe effective web accessibility. POUR stands for perceivable (how online content can be perceived), operable (how easily users can interact with your online content), understandable (how easily users can digest and understand your content), and robust (how your content can keep up with current and new technology). Read more on our blog: Website accessibility for beginners.

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